Manga Review: Her Impact! #0

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I’m not going to lie that these days I’m fairly behind on reading new manga. So when someone recommends a new one for me to check out, I feel compelled to give it a shot. Especially when it is a new series that aims to break the mold from those more mainstream. Her Impact! had me at the idea that this could have such a grip on reality and a real-world situation that is relatable.

As a zero issue, the expectation is always that you are welcoming new readers to your story and characters. The goal is that by the end of the issue you should feel comfortable with what the book has to offer you. It should be easy to get into, and easier to explain to someone else if you wanted to recommend it. After reading Her Impact! #0 I feel that they accomplished just that from start to finish. In the beginning they got a little more in detail about this legacy that Sadie Hiroshi is trying to follow. In some cases you probably wouldn’t need to know the specifics of the kind of boxer her father was, but as a zero issue it doesn’t hurt to flesh out her father’s story during a career moment.

For Sadie herself, little time was wasted diving into her personal life between work and being a single mom. The sentiment between Sadie and her son was nice because you weren’t getting the cliche of a rebellious kid to deal with. It can be a bit much these days when you have that single mom who struggles with a kid who can’t see that they’re being nothing more than a distraction. Luckily this series looks like the aim is to shake things up from what you expect. Her work life in contrast was intriguing since the problem was in the appeal of her job rather than it being one that can’t support her. From the minute you saw that the problem was a job that didn’t make her happy, you knew that the intent was to steer her in a direction where she would have to choose convenience over legacy.

Sadie’s characterization was appealing from the minute she is introduced. Sure she yells a lot, but her aggressiveness is a personality you look for in someone who was born to a boxer. Her attitude is just like anyone else who hates crappy bosses, and just like any mother with a good relationship with their kid. You await that impact that boxing will have on her, but we have enough to go off of to like Sadie.

As always when giving a book like this a shot, you worry about the quality of the artwork as much as the story. Actually being a manga didn’t leave me very skeptical as I would with most other comics. There are only so many styles you can use, and it is all about the time and effort that you put into the details and making the art pop. With the right perspective you could tell right away that Sadie was an African-Japanese woman and that was good for a start. It would be nice to see who her mom was to see where she gets the African side from though, but that’s something for another time. The fun is in the way Sadie is drawn to capture her personality. Confrontational, indecisive, and at the same time caring. You could look at her and see that she was someone still trying to figure things out. The other characters stood out with little things here and there that separated them from everyone else. I actually appreciated that most of the hairstyles seen were nothing over-the-top. That can sometimes drive me crazy since it tells you they are trying too hard. They kept the designs real and manageable.

Her Impact! #0 is a solid introduction to a manga series worth giving a shot. Not enough notable manga out there will focus on sports like this, or give you enough character diversity either. Truthfully I was old just on the fact that this was about an African-Japanese woman. Everything after that was just giving me more reason to want to invest in this story.

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Editor Rating
 
Total Score
8.1